Posts

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Involving Families in Public Policy Innovation to Reduce Cost-Driven Moves and Related Disruption

This is a commentary to Moving Because of Unaffordable Housing and Disrupted Social Safety Net Access Among Children by Kathryn M. Leifheit et al. Click here to read the original […]

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Moving Because of Unaffordable Housing and Disrupted Social Safety Net Access Among Children

OBJECTIVES: To measure associations between residential moves because of unaffordable housing costs and disruptions in access to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program; the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, […]

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An Apple a Day Won’t Even Be Affordable for Children if Critical Program Isn’t Funded

As Congress approaches yet another deadline to fund the government and its programs, the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC)—a program that provides healthy foods and […]

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2023 Year in Review

2023 was a special year for Children’s HealthWatch: we not only celebrated 25 years of advancing racially equitable and inclusive policies that support young children and families but our research […]

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Doctors and health systems find novel ways to address hunger and its causes

Originally posted on Fern’s AG Insider. Allison Bovell-Ammon, director of policy strategy at Children’s HealthWatch, an advocacy and research organization headquartered at Boston Medical Center, described some of the ways […]

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For Immigrant Mothers, WIC Nutrition Program Led to Healthier Infant Birth Weights

Originally posted on HealthCity. The Bottom Line | Participation in Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) during pregnancy by immigrant mothers with low incomes is associated with healthier […]

Keeping Children’s Weight on Track: A Pathway to Health and Well-Being

This report card examines children’ weight over time. We looked at almost 3,000 infants and toddlers from low-income families who started life in a healthy state  – born at a […]

Treatment Plan for Hunger: SNAP, WIC, and the Community Eligibility Provision

About the What If? Series Through the What If Project, Children’s HealthWatch is providing real and specific models of better policy futures, working toward our vision of a future where all […]

What if… the United States decided to proactively alleviate food insecurity?

What if… the Unites States decided to proactively alleviate food insecurity? Finally, after years of sluggish, uncertain growth following the Great Recession, the United States economy appears to have surged […]

The $1.2 Billion Child Health Dividend

Health and special education-related costs of food insecurity for households with young children in the US were estimated to total more than $1.2 billion in 2015 dollars. The persistently high prevalence of food insecurity continues to drain resources from families, communities, and the U.S. economy. Key policy changes in a variety of areas could alleviate hardships and reduce costs, ultimately improving the future prosperity of all people in the US. Social infrastructures, including nutrition assistance programs and working-family tax credits, provide vital resources for reducing food insecurity and saving money.