Posts

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Boost to SNAP Benefits Protected Young Children’s Health

Children’s HealthWatch published a new policy brief on the positive impact of SNAP benefits on young children.

Drexel University

Presented at the Symposium with Under Secretary Kevin Concannon.

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Federal Programs that Protect Young Children’s Health

Children’s HealthWatch published a new policy brief on federal programs that support young children’s health and development.

University of Minnesota

Presented at the School of Public Health’s film festival “Food Stamped” on low-income families’ struggle to eat a healthy, well-balanced diet on a food stamp budget.

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Too Many Hurdles: Barriers to Receiving SNAP Put Children’s Health at Risk

Children’s HealthWatch published a new policy brief on the consequences of limiting young children’s access to SNAP.

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Earning More, Receiving Less: Loss of Benefits and Child Hunger

Children’s HealthWatch published a new policy brief on how employment can lead to a harmful loss of benefit for needy families.

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Coming Up Short: High food costs outstrip food stamp benefits (The Real Cost of a Healthy Diet: 2008)

The Real Cost of a Healthy Diet Project investigated the availability and affordability of healthy food in two cities. This project, based at the Boston Medical Center and Drexel University’s School of Public Health, examined whether low-income residents in Boston and Philadelphia could buy food for a healthy diet using the maximum food stamp benefit in their neighborhood food stores. The study found that even families receiving the maximum food stamp benefit would have to spend an additional $2,520 in Boston and $3,165 in Philadelphia annually to purchase the Thrifty Food Plan.

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Coming Up Short: High food costs outstrip food stamp benefits (The Real Cost of a Healthy Diet: Boston, 2008)

Results are based on data collected in  four stores in each of four Boston neighborhoods (16 stores total). The average monthly cost of the Thrifty Food Plan (TFP) was $752, 39%  higher than the maximum monthly food stamp benefit for a family of four. On average, the TFP could not be purchased with the maximum […]

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Food Security: Ensuring the health of Baltimore’s babies

Food insecurity is the lack of access to enough food for an active and healthy lifestyle for all household members due to financial constraints. Families who are food insecure often limit the quality and quantity of food that is available to family members. As a result, families fill up on low-cost foods with little nutritional value. This report demonstrates the impact that food insecurity has on the health and development of children in the city of Baltimore. Furthermore, it examines the role of nutrition-related public assistance programs (i.e.: Food Stamps, WIC) in food insecure families.