Posts

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Blog by Miao Gong, Intern at Children’s HealthWatch

I’m 7 years old, walking hand-in-hand with my grandpa going to buy groceries for the week. It’s a hot summer day in Chicago and I know it’s going to rain later because the humidity was making grandpa’s joints ache and my stray hairs fly up. We walk into the store, which is tucked into the […]

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SNAP Is Medicine for Food Insecurity

As we awoke this month to another dispiriting report of the numbers of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infections and deaths, a new set of horrifying statistics hit the airwaves. By the end of April 2020, 2 in 5 households with children <12 were food insecure (meaning they were unable to afford enough food for all […]

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Regional Differences in Food Prices Highlight Inadequacy of SNAP Benefits

A new study affirms SNAP’s positive association with better health outcomes, but reveals regional gaps in its value. CONTEXT   |   Food insecurity during childhood jeopardizes children’s long-term mental and physical health. Studies have stressed ties between childhood food insecurity and a range of issues, including lower academic achievement, depressive or anxious symptoms, as well as chronic physical health problems. The Supplemental […]

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SNAP and Working Families: Solutions for Good Health

Summary of Findings: The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) provides nutritional support for income-eligible families, most of whom have working adults. However, as families increase their income, they may experience a reduction or loss of SNAP benefits that leaves them with fewer overall resources. Children’s HealthWatch research demonstrated that working families that increased their income […]

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SNAP Benefit Adequacy: What Does the Research Tell Us?

Originally published on FRAC ResearchWIRE. The average participant in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) receives $1.40 per person per meal. Peer-reviewed journal articles, government reports, expert reviews, and community-based studies all concur — the SNAP benefit is inadequate for purchasing a healthy diet. SNAP eligibility is based on a complex, multistep calculation of income […]

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Keeping Children’s Weight on Track: A Pathway to Health and Well-Being

This report card examines children’ weight over time. We looked at almost 3,000 infants and toddlers from low-income families who started life in a healthy state  – born at a healthy birth weight and at term. Most children remained at a healthy weight at both visits (on average 1 year apart). Children with an unhealthy […]

Field Hearing: Growing Jobs and Economic Opportunity: Perspectives on the 2018 Farm Bill

Written Testimony Submitted to the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry United States Senate Katherine Alaimo, PhD, MS Associate Professor, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Michigan State University Mariana Chilton, PhD, MPH Director, Center for Hunger-Free Communities Drexel University Dornsife School of Public Health Co-Principal Investigator, Children’s […]

Cliff Effects and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program

The American Dream tells us that if we just work hard enough, no matter our origins, we can succeed. However, many low-income families in the United States would beg to differ. Their efforts to become self-sufficient through employment can trigger a reduction in or termination of their benefits, resulting in a net loss of income […]

Feedback to House Agriculture Committee: Past, Present, and Future of SNAP Hearing Series

On October 4, 2016, Children’s HealthWatch Principal Investigator, Dr. Eduardo Ochoa, provided testimony to Chairman Conaway and to the House Agriculture Committee to provide feedback on the Past, Present and Future of SNAP hearings held over the last two years by the Committee.

Feedback to House Agriculture Committee Past, Present, and Future of SNAP Hearing Series

On October 4, 2016, Children’s HealthWatch Principal Investigator, Dr. Mariana Chilton, provided testimony to Chairman Conaway and to the House Agriculture Committee to provide feedback on the Past, Present and Future of SNAP hearings held over the last two years by the Committee.