Posts

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Children’s HealthWatch Comment on the Supplemental Poverty Measure NASEM

Children’s HealthWatch appreciates the opportunity to comment on potential changes being considered in the 2021 review of the Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM). Headquartered at Boston Medical Center, we are a nonpartisan network of pediatricians, public health researchers, and children’s health and policy experts committed to improving children’s health in America. We do that by collecting […]

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Effects of Maternal Homelessness, Supplemental Nutrition Programs, and Prenatal PM2.5 on Birthweight

Abstract: Few studies examined the impact of maternal socioeconomic status and of its combined effects with environmental exposures on birthweight. Our goal was to examine the impact of maternal homelessness (mothers ever homeless or who lived in shelters during pregnancy) and participation in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) during […]

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Prenatal Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children Participation: A Step Toward Human Capital Development

This JAMA Pediatrics editorial focuses on the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program, evaluations of the program before and after the 2009 food package revisions, and a new JAMA Pediatrics quasi-experimental study by Hamad et al that looks at whether the revised 2009 WIC food package improved perinatal and birth […]

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Keeping Children’s Weight on Track: A Pathway to Health and Well-Being

This report card examines children’ weight over time. We looked at almost 3,000 infants and toddlers from low-income families who started life in a healthy state  – born at a healthy birth weight and at term. Most children remained at a healthy weight at both visits (on average 1 year apart). Children with an unhealthy […]

Can Food Insecurity Be Reduced in the United States by Improving SNAP, WIC, and the Community Eligibility Provision?

Adequate nutrition is essential to children’s rapidly developing brains and bodies. Lack of resources can lead to inadequate access to sufficient food (food insecurity). Fortunately, the United States has programs to provide children and families with nutritional support. Using simulation modeling, we identify three policies that ensure young children have reliable access to food. (i) […]

Keeping Science at the Center of Nutrition Policy

Every five years Congress reauthorizes the Child Nutrition Act, which is designed to meet the nutritional needs of children from the prenatal period through adolescence. The Act includes the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP), the National School Lunch and National School Breakfast […]

What is the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) and why does it matter?

When I took my 7-month-old daughter, Beatrice, to daycare today I received an application for the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP), the federally funded nutrition program which provides meals for children across the country in child care settings. After I glanced at the application packet and said hello to the other parents dropping […]

Born to Thrive Minnesota Summit: Growing Strong, Smart Kids through Healthy Eating and Active Play

On December 9, 2014, Dr. Diana Cutts, Children’s HealthWatch Principal Investigator and Pediatrician at Hennepin County Medical Center, presented at the Born to Thrive Minnesota Summit on Perspectives from the Field. Click here for presentation slides.

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Investing today to create a more productive workforce tomorrow

In 2012, I was introduced to the work of Children’s HealthWatch as part of a volunteer strategic consulting team. My fellow Yale MBA colleagues and I spent months reviewing their work by conducting interviews with policy makers and discussing ways in which the research of Children’s HealthWatch could make a bigger impact. During these months […]

Healing the whole child is health care innovation

When the Great Recession hit in 2008, I immediately began to worry about its impacts on the bodies of the very young patients in my Growth and Development clinic at Arkansas Children’s Hospital (ACH) in Little Rock. Moreover, the data we collect in the Pediatric Emergency Department corroborated what I sensed from my patients to […]