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New federal report surprises: Philadelphia poverty down, income up

Philadelphia’s poverty rate, a stark and stubborn indicator of hard times that has long hindered the city’s reputation, dropped to its lowest level since 2008 — near the start of the recession. At the same time, median household income here rose. The findings, contained in a voluminous report from the U.S. Census Bureau released Thursday, […]

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SNAP and Working Families: Solutions for Good Health

Summary of Findings: The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) provides nutritional support for income-eligible families, most of whom have working adults. However, as families increase their income, they may experience a reduction or loss of SNAP benefits that leaves them with fewer overall resources. Children’s HealthWatch research demonstrated that working families that increased their income […]

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SNAP, Young Children’s Health, and Family Food Security and Healthcare Access

Introduction: The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is the largest nutrition assistance program in the U.S. This study’s objective was to examine the associations between SNAP participation and young children’s health and development, caregiver health, and family economic hardships. Methods: Cross-sectional data from 2006 to 2016 were analyzed in 2017 for families with children aged […]

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Children’s HealthWatch’s Public Comment To Oppose the Proposed Changes to Categorical Eligibility in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)

On September 16th, Children’s HealthWatch submitted a public comment on the Food and Nutrition Service’s (FNS) Notice of Public Rule Making (NPRM) for “Revision of Categorical Eligibility in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)” published on July 24, 2019. We strongly oppose the proposed changes because decades of evidence show this rule will threaten the […]

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Weighing the Toll of Food Insecurity

Food insecurity isn’t directly tied to obesity among young children from low-income families – but it is linked to poor overall health, a new study indicates. Food-insecure households lack consistent access to enough food for an active and healthy life, and the effects on children can be serious. Previous research indicates food-insecure children may be at greater risk of […]

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Food insecurity in toddler years linked to poor health, says new research

TORONTO: Young kids, who grow up in homes with limited access to nutritious foods are more likely to experience poor overall health and developmental problems, says a new study. However, these kids are not at higher risk of developing obesity, the research added. For the findings, published in the journal Pediatrics, the researchers analysed data from […]

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Children From Families With Food Insecurity Likely To Suffer From Poor Health: Study

A balanced diet comprising a mix of nutritional foods is important to obtain a healthy body. In the growing up years, it gets even more important to feed the body with foods that help in development and growth of various body parts. Unfortunately, families falling in low-income category are sometimes unable to provide proper nutrition […]

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Food insecurity in toddler years linked to poor health, but not obesity

Young children, who grow up in homes with limited access to nutritious foods (known as food insecurity), are more likely to experience poor overall health, hospitalizations, and developmental problems, but they are not at higher risk of developing obesity, a new University of Maryland School of Medicine study finds. The research, published today in the […]

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Early childhood food insecurity linked to poor health and development, not obesity

Originally published on 2 Minute Medicine. 1. Young children in food insecure households had higher odds of caregiver-reported fair or poor health and developmental risk, compared with children in food secure households. 2. There was a significant association between food insecurity and obesity in only one age group; otherwise, there were no associations between food […]

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SNAP Benefit Adequacy: What Does the Research Tell Us?

Originally published on FRAC ResearchWIRE. The average participant in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) receives $1.40 per person per meal. Peer-reviewed journal articles, government reports, expert reviews, and community-based studies all concur — the SNAP benefit is inadequate for purchasing a healthy diet. SNAP eligibility is based on a complex, multistep calculation of income […]