Health and special education-related costs of food insecurity for households with young children in the US were estimated to total more than $1.2 billion in 2015 dollars. The persistently high prevalence of food insecurity continues to drain resources from families, communities, and the U.S. economy. Key policy changes in a variety of areas could alleviate hardships and reduce costs, ultimately improving the future prosperity of all people in the US. Social infrastructures, including nutrition assistance programs and working-family tax credits, provide vital resources for reducing food insecurity and saving money.

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The $1.2 Billion Child Health Dividend