Posts

3 providers that target housing to improve patient health

Boston Medical Center has partnered with a number of community groups to target children in families that have high rates of emergency department use, according to the report. ER “superusers” are a significant burden on the industry, and BMC’s program offers housing prescriptions to patients and connects them with care coordination services to prevent unneeded […]

The New Housing Call for Pediatricians

One Boston-based pediatrician tells us how by investing in innovative solutions that ensure stable, affordable housing, we can ensure that all children have the opportunity to live happy, healthy lives. In studies conducted by Children’s HealthWatch in Boston, researchers used overcrowding and multiple moves in one year as indicators. These and other studies show that housing […]

Can the Housing Vaccine Help a Community? Thinking from People to Populations

I have been traveling a lot this fall to meetings with leaders in housing development, policy, and research, and I am always struck that the housing world is starting to connect the dots on housing and health, but they are not talking about the patients I see. When talking to parents of young patients at […]

Mothers’ hopes and dreams – keeping our children safe, fed and housed

As a mother of two beautiful young girls, nothing brings me greater joy than seeing the smiles on their faces. They keep me going even when things in life are difficult. I am also blessed to have had the opportunity to take in a good friend’s younger brother; he is now my brother, too.  When […]

Children’s HealthWatch Webinar — RX for Healthy Child Development: Nutritious, Affordable Food Promotes Health and Economic Stability for Boston Families

Hosted a webinar, which featured the release of a new Children’s HealthWatch Policy Action Brief: “RX for Healthy Child Development: Nutritious, Affordable Food Promotes Health and Economic Stability for Boston Families.”

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RX for Healthy Child Development: Nutritious, Affordable Food Promotes Health and Economic Stability for Boston Families

Marking the second installment in the five-city Children’s HealthWatch Policy Action Brief Series – Hunger: A New Vital Sign, Children’s HealthWatch published a new Policy Action Brief – RX for Healthy Child Development: Nutritious, Affordable Food Promotes Health and Economic Stability for Boston Families. The Boston brief, sheds light on the role that nutritious, affordable food plays in promoting health […]

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Safe, Stable Homes Mean Healthier Children and Families for Massachusetts

CHW published a new policy brief on the impact of housing instability on Boston’s children.

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Behind Closed Doors: The hidden health impact of being behind on rent

New research by Children’s HealthWatch finds that families who are behind on rent are more likely to have children in fair or poor health, at risk of developmental delays, and a mother who has symptoms of depression compared to families who are not behind on rent.  Strikingly, the negative health impacts of being behind on rent are […]

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Bringing Children in from the Cold: Solutions for Boston’s Hidden Homeless

Children’s HealthWatch and the Medical-Legal Partnership | Boston released a joint report entitled “Bringing Children in from the Cold: Solutions for Boston’s Hidden Homeless.” The report describes a population of “hidden homeless” families and new research showing that children in these families are more likely to be hungry and in poor health. Unrecorded by any homeless census, these families move frequently, often into overcrowded apartments, or double up with another family never knowing how long they can stay. The report estimates that there are over 14,800 hidden homeless families in Boston and that this number is likely to grow as the economy declines.

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The Real Cost of a Healthy Diet: Healthful Foods Are Out of Reach for Low-Income Families in Boston, Massachusetts (2005)

A report from a research team from the Boston Medical Center Department of Pediatrics revealing that, on average, the monthly cost of the Thrifty Food Plan (upon which Food Stamp Program benefits are based) is $27 more than the maximum monthly food stamp benefit allowance. A low-cost healthier diet based on the most recent nutrition guidelines exceeded the maximum monthly food stamp benefit by $148 — an annual differential of $1,776. This is an unrealistic budgetary stretch for most families who qualify for nutrition assistance.