Children with Special Health Care Needs and Disabilities: Solutions for Stable Homes

Summary of Findings All children need stable homes to thrive. High costs associated with raising a young child with special health care needs (SHCN) may strain a family’s budget and impact their ability to afford housing expenses. Children’s HealthWatch research demonstrates that compared to children without SHCN, children with SHCN are more likely to live […]

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An Avoidable $2.4 Billion Cost: Food Insecurity and Hunger in Massachusetts

A conservative $2.4 billion per year would be saved in treating medical issues that are linked to food insecurity. Improving food security among Massachusetts residents would reduce healthcare costs for individuals, families, and the Commonwealth. For more information on the cost of food insecurity and hunger in Massachusetts, please visit MAcostofhunger.org.

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Report Card on Food Insecurity and Immigration: Helping Our Youngest First-Generation Americans to Thrive

In this report card, Children’s HealthWatch research highlights the disparities immigrant families with young citizen children experience in their ability to afford enough food and describes the severity of that deprivation. This report card also explores how the length of time mothers have lived in the U.S. is related to their family’s ability to afford […]

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Treatment Plan for Hunger: SNAP, WIC, and the Community Eligibility Provision

About the What If? Series Through the What If Project, Children’s HealthWatch is providing real and specific models of better policy futures, working toward our vision of a future where all children’s basic needs are met, sustaining their health and enabling them to reach their potential. For this brief, Children’s HealthWatch asked, “What if we optimized […]

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Supporting Young Children with Disabilities: Solutions for Improving Food Security

High costs associated with raising a child with disabilities can strain the family budget and lead to trade-offs between basic needs. Children’s HealthWatch research demonstrated that families of children with SHCN who receive SSI were more likely to be food insecure compared with families of children with SHCN not receiving SSI.

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The $1.2 Billion Child Health Dividend

Health and special education-related costs of food insecurity for households with young children in the US were estimated to total more than $1.2 billion in 2015 dollars. The persistently high prevalence of food insecurity continues to drain resources from families, communities, and the U.S. economy. Key policy changes in a variety of areas could alleviate hardships and reduce costs, ultimately improving the future prosperity of all people in the US. Social infrastructures, including nutrition assistance programs and working-family tax credits, provide vital resources for reducing food insecurity and saving money.