Ending Hunger in Our Classrooms: Expanding “After the Bell” Breakfast Programs for Massachusetts Students

School breakfast plays a critical role in improving health, closing the achievement gap, and reducing hunger. Research from Children’s HealthWatch and the Eos Foundation ranks 33 high poverty districts in Massachusetts on their school breakfast participation rates. Of the nearly 300,000 children in high poverty districts who were eligible for free and reduced price breakfast […]

The Affordable Housing Ripple Effect: Improving Availability of Subsidized Housing Increases Housing Stability

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Treatment Plan for Hunger: SNAP, WIC, and the Community Eligibility Provision

About the What If? Series Through the What If Project, Children’s HealthWatch is providing real and specific models of better policy futures, working toward our vision of a future where all children’s basic needs are met, sustaining their health and enabling them to reach their potential. For this brief, Children’s HealthWatch asked, “What if we optimized […]

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Supporting Young Children with Disabilities: Solutions for Improving Food Security

High costs associated with raising a child with disabilities can strain the family budget and lead to trade-offs between basic needs. Children’s HealthWatch research demonstrated that families of children with SHCN who receive SSI were more likely to be food insecure compared with families of children with SHCN not receiving SSI.

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The $1.2 Billion Child Health Dividend

Health and special education-related costs of food insecurity for households with young children in the US were estimated to total more than $1.2 billion in 2015 dollars. The persistently high prevalence of food insecurity continues to drain resources from families, communities, and the U.S. economy. Key policy changes in a variety of areas could alleviate hardships and reduce costs, ultimately improving the future prosperity of all people in the US. Social infrastructures, including nutrition assistance programs and working-family tax credits, provide vital resources for reducing food insecurity and saving money.

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The Earned Income Tax Credit in Massachusetts: Alleviating poverty today, increasing opportunity tomorrow

The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) is widely considered one of the most effective anti-poverty programs for working families. The Massachusetts EITC was first enacted in 1997. In 2015, both Democratic and Republican legislators in the Commonwealth, along with Governor Baker, successfully increased the Massachusetts EITC to 23 percent of the federal credit. More than […]

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Housing as a Health Care Investment: Affordable Housing Supports Children’s Health

Affordable and stable housing plays a critical role in supporting the health and well-being of children. Research from Children’s HealthWatch shows public investment in housing—including housing for homeless families and rental assistance for food-insecure families—improves the health outcomes of vulnerable infants and young children and lowers health care spending. The findings show that homelessness and […]

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Aspen Dialogue: “Advancing Health through Food Security: A Multi-Sector Approach to Address the Disease Burden and Costs of U.S. Food Insecurity on our Health System”

Children’s HealthWatch founder and Principal Investigator, Dr. Deborah Frank, contributed directly to the Aspen Institute final report of the Aspen Dialogue: “Advancing Health through Food Security: A Multi-Sector Approach to Address the Disease Burden and Costs of U.S. Food Insecurity on our Health System.” The report is focused on the group’s framings of the relationship […]