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Welfare Cap On Kids Needs To Go

Originally posted by The Boston Globe as a Letter to the Editor.  Kudos for taking a stand in your editorial “Cap on kids a failed welfare experience” (March 7). Massachusetts — it is embarrassing to say — is only one in 17 states that still has a similar welfare policy discriminating against children’s rights. This […]

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As affordable housing crisis worsens, Trump proposes more cuts

Originally posted on Curbed.  The cost of fixing the nation’s widening affordable housing shortage measures in the billions of dollars. But if the healthcare costs that come with this lack of housing security are factored in, replenishing and expanding our low-income housing stock becomes an even better investment. During a press call about The Gap—the National […]

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Trump’s housing budget leaves poorest out in the cold, advocates say

Originally published on Reuters.  WASHINGTON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – A decade after the housing bubble burst in the United States, affordable homes are available to as little as 20 percent of the poorest families that need them in some states, according to a report published by housing advocates on Thursday. That national shortfall, despite showing […]

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House begins child nutrition reauthorization, but no schedule yet

Originally publihsed by The Hagstrom Report. The House Education & Labor Committee began the process of reauthorizing the child nutrition programs today, but House Education & Labor Chairman Bobby Scott, D-Va., declined to say how soon the committee would move forward with a bill. After a Civil Rights and Human Services Subcommittee hearing today, Scott […]

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Cap on kids was a failed welfare experiment

Originally published on the Boston Globe.  A generation-long experiment that capped family welfare benefits, by penalizing those who gave birth while on public assistance, is at long last headed for the scrap heap of bad ideas in Massachusetts. The day can’t come soon enough. Repeal of the so-called “cap on kids” has been kicking around […]

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Policy Prescriptions for Health: Baltimore’s “Checkup” Shows Hardship-Free Kids are Healthier Kids

Originally published on FRAC’s ResearchWire newsletter. After the holidays, people tend to do two things: make New Year’s resolutions and schedule an appointment for their annual checkup. Checkup appointments not only look at the current status of a patient’s health, but also provide an opportunity for clinicians to advise a patient on how to maintain […]

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Free tax preparation helps low-income workers get their full refunds

Originally published on Telegram.Com FITCHBURG – With all the benefits the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) brings to families, if EITC were a drug, it would be available in every pharmacy across the state, says Stephanie Ettinger de Cuba, executive director of Children’s Healthwatch. Ms. Ettinger de Cuba was speaking Friday in the Montachusett Opportunity […]

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It’s time to make a federal case out of Dallas’ homeless problem

Originally published by The Dallas Morning News. Stable housing is a prescription for good health, but it’s out of reach for many North Texas families, especially the poorest who are hardest hit. It doesn’t take a doctor to diagnose the housing shortage in North Texas. Pediatricians see everyday families that cannot solve the puzzle of how […]

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New Reports Link Hunger, Structural Racism, and Discrimination

Originally published on Nonprofit Quarterly. According to Hunger Free America’s 2018 United States Hunger Atlas, one in eight Americans, representing 12.3 percent of the population, are food insecure, meaning they are unable to afford a consistent supply of food throughout the year. While this is startling enough, when looking at racial and ethnic disparities, the story is […]

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Drexel research links racism and hunger

Originally posted on WHYY. New research out of Drexel University finds that racism can be a catalyst for food insecurity. Released Monday by the school’s Center for Hunger-Free Communities, the report shows that people who experienced discrimination firsthand struggled with hunger twice as often as others. When – or where – that discrimination occurred didn’t matter. However, […]